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TECHNICAL PAPERS
Jul 1, 2007

Stress Concentration Solution for a 2D Dent in an Internally Pressurized Cylinder

Publication: Journal of Engineering Mechanics
Volume 133, Issue 7

Abstract

Dent imperfections in internally pressurized shells have a stress concentration effect. In cylindrical shells under internal pressure, such as pipelines, stress concentrations associated with dent imperfections can degrade in-service performance. A new semianalytical solution is developed for the stress concentration distribution present along the two-dimensional circumferential cross section of a cylinder under internal pressure containing a local dent-like imperfection. An equivalent load approach is used. Results are compared against finite-element results. For practical application, the stress concentration factor (SCF) present at the outer surface of the dent center is derived. Parametric studies with this expression show that long dent stress concentrations are primarily influenced by the dent depth-pipe thickness and the dent depth-pipe diameter ratios. Example cases show that SCF values between 10.0 and 20.0 are possible and that even shallow dent SCFs can be above 2.0.

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Acknowledgments

This material was researched while both writers were affiliated with Texas A&M University. The material is based upon work supported under a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. Additional support was provided by the Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University. Richard Gehle provided assistance in preparing certain figures. Nick Zettlemoyer provided extensive and thoughtful comments.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

Go to Journal of Engineering Mechanics
Journal of Engineering Mechanics
Volume 133Issue 7July 2007
Pages: 792 - 800

History

Received: Oct 31, 2005
Accepted: Apr 18, 2007
Published online: Jul 1, 2007
Published in print: Jul 2007

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Notes

Note. Associate Editor: Khaled W. Shahwan

Authors

Affiliations

Adam J. Rinehart
M.ASCE
Research Engineer, Offshore Division, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co., URC/GW3/745, P.O. Box 2189, Houston TX 77252-2189 (corresponding author). E-mail: [email protected]
Peter B. Keating
Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Texas A&M Univ., MS 3136 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3136. E-mail:[email protected]

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