Abstract

The efforts to share and reuse knowledge generated on construction projects are undermined mainly by the loss of important insights and knowledge due to the time lapse in capturing the knowledge, staff turnover, and people’s reluctance to share knowledge. To address this, it is crucial for knowledge to be captured “live” in a collaborative environment while the project is being executed and presented in a format that will facilitate its reuse during and after the project. This paper uses a case study approach to investigate the end-users’ requirements for a methodology for the live capture and reuse of knowledge, and the shortcomings of current practice in meeting these requirements. A methodology for the live capture and reuse of project knowledge is then presented and discussed. The methodology, which comprises a web-based knowledge base, an integrated work-flow system and a project knowledge manager as the administrator, allows project knowledge to be captured live from ongoing projects. This also incorporates mechanisms to hasten knowledge validation and the dissemination of the knowledge once it has been validated.

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Acknowledgments

The writers would like to thank EPSRC for funding and industrial collaborators for their collaboration on this project.

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Go to Journal of Management in Engineering
Journal of Management in Engineering
Volume 23Issue 1January 2007
Pages: 18 - 26

History

Received: Jul 26, 2005
Accepted: May 10, 2006
Published online: Jan 1, 2007
Published in print: Jan 2007

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Hai Chen Tan [email protected]
Research Associate, Dept. of Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough Univ., Loughborough LE11 3TU, U.K. E-mail: [email protected]
Patricia M. Carrillo [email protected]
Professor, Dept. of Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough Univ., Loughborough LE11 3TU, U.K. E-mail: [email protected]
Chimay J. Anumba, M.ASCE [email protected]
Professor, Dept. of Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough Univ., Loughborough LE11 3TU, U.K. E-mail: [email protected]
Nasreddine (Dino) Bouchlaghem [email protected]
Professor, Dept. of Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough Univ., Loughborough LE11 3TU, U.K. E-mail: [email protected]
John M. Kamara [email protected]
Senior Lecturer, School of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape, Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, U.K. E-mail: [email protected]
Chika E. Udeaja [email protected]
Lecturer, School of the Built Environment, Northumbria Univ., Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 8ST, U.K. E-mail: [email protected]

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