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TECHNICAL PAPERS
Dec 1, 2001

GIS and Distributed Watershed Models. II: Modules, Interfaces, and Models

Publication: Journal of Hydrologic Engineering
Volume 6, Issue 6

Abstract

This paper presents representative applications and models that can take advantage of spatially distributed data in a geographic information system (GIS) format for watershed analysis and hydrologic modeling purposes. The intention is to inform hydrologic engineers about the current capabilities of GIS, hydrologic analysis modules, and distributed hydrologic models, and to provide an initial guide on implementing GIS for hydrologic modeling. This paper also discusses key implementation issues for individuals and organizations that are considering making the transition to the use of GIS in hydrology. Widespread use of GIS modules and distributed watershed models is inevitable. The controlling factors are data availability, GIS-module development, fundamental research on the applicability of distributed hydrologic models, and finally, regulatory acceptance of the new tools and methodologies. GIS modules and distributed hydrologic models will enable the progression of hydrology from a field dominated by techniques that require spatial averaging and empiricism to a more spatially descriptive science.

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Go to Journal of Hydrologic Engineering
Journal of Hydrologic Engineering
Volume 6Issue 6December 2001
Pages: 515 - 523

History

Received: Nov 7, 2000
Published online: Dec 1, 2001
Published in print: Dec 2001

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Authors

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Assoc. Prof., Dept. of Civ. and Envir. Engrg. U-37, Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269. E-mail: [email protected]
Res. Hydr. Engr., U.S. Dept. of Agr., Agric. Res. Service, SPA, Grazinglands Res. Lab., 7207 W. Cheyenne St., El Reno, OK 73036. E-mail: [email protected]
Mgr., Storm Water Mgmt. and River-Stream Hydr. Sect. and GIS Coordinator, Borton-Lawson Engineering, 613 Baltimore Dr., Ste. 300, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702-7903 (corresponding author). E-mail: pdebarry@ borton-lawson.com
Prof., Dept. of Civ. Engrg., Univ. of Colorado, Denver, CO 80217. E-mail: [email protected]

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