TECHNICAL PAPERS
Jul 15, 2009

Explaining Subjective Risks of Hurricanes and the Role of Risks in Intended Moving and Location Choice Models

Publication: Natural Hazards Review
Volume 10, Issue 3

Abstract

Using stated choice survey data we report on subjects’ perceptions of the risks of hurricanes and intended relocation decisions when faced with such risks. All of the subjects were displaced by either Hurricane Katrina or Rita, in New Orleans and other Gulf Coast areas in 2005. Results here suggest that subjective perceptions of risk are quite high as compared to scientific estimates of risk, and relocation decisions revealed from a discrete choice experiment are significantly determined by levels of hurricane strike risks.

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Acknowledgments

The writers thank, without implicating for any mistakes or errors that remain, V. Kerry Smith, for his valuable comments on risk relating to the initial survey/experimental protocol, and Jamie Kruse and other participants of the July 2007 Hazards and Disasters Researchers’ Meeting in Boulder, Colorado for their comments on the paper. Finally, John Whitehead graciously sent us new papers relating to the issues here and we thank him for those. Data collection and analyses were funded by the Small Grant Exploratory Research (SGER) Program of the National Science Foundation.

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Published In

Go to Natural Hazards Review
Natural Hazards Review
Volume 10Issue 3August 2009
Pages: 102 - 112

History

Received: Jun 25, 2007
Accepted: Sep 26, 2008
Published online: Jul 15, 2009
Published in print: Aug 2009

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Authors

Affiliations

Justin Baker [email protected]
Research Analyst, Center on Global Change, Duke University, Box 90658, Durham, NC 27708–0658; formerly, Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX 77843-2124. E-mail: [email protected]
W. Douglass Shaw [email protected]
Professor, Dept. of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M Univ., 308F Blocker, 2124 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-2124 (corresponding author). E-mail: [email protected]
Graduate Student, Dept. of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M Univ., 341B Blocker, 2124 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-2124. E-mail: [email protected]
Assistant Professor, Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX 77843-3137. E-mail: [email protected]
Mary Riddel [email protected]
Associate Professor, Dept. of Economics, Univ. of Nevada, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 456005, Las Vegas, NV 89154–6005. E-mail: [email protected]
Richard T. Woodward [email protected]
Associate Professor, Dept. of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M Univ., 308D Blocker, 2124 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-2124. E-mail: [email protected]
William Neilson [email protected]
Professor, Dept. of Economics, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996–0550. E-mail: [email protected]

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