Technical Papers
Jun 10, 2016

Uniform Pushdown Approach for Quantifying Building-Frame Robustness and the Consequence of Disproportionate Collapse

Publication: Journal of Performance of Constructed Facilities
Volume 30, Issue 6

Abstract

This paper proposes a framework for quantifying the structural robustness of building frames that utilizes a relative numerical interpretation of the strength degradation in response to a damage event. The approach leverages uniform pushdown methods in the context of the current design procedures for resisting progressive and/or disproportionate collapse. The primary metric used to evaluate the structure’s collapse resistance is the magnitude of applied load that the damaged system can support relative to both the design loads and the capacity of the undamaged system. By leveraging several aspects of current alternate path approaches to progressive collapse–resistant design, the framework provides practicing engineers with an accessible tool for evaluating the relative robustness of structural systems. A prototype eight-story, precast/prestressed concrete moment frame system is used as a case study to demonstrate the utility of this procedure. The prototype system is modified to increase its collapse resistance and is analyzed via uniform pushdown analysis for several damage scenarios to obtain values of robustness. This case study demonstrates the ability of the proposed framework to efficiently and rationally compare design alternatives based on their relative robustness and the consequences of potential overload.

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Acknowledgments

Many thanks to PCI for their funding support of the authors’ current and ongoing research efforts on this project via the 2014 PCI Daniel P. Jenny Research Fellowship. The authors also gratefully acknowledge that Mr. Fallon’s participation in the project has been supported in part by Lehigh University via the Moore Graduate Fellowship.

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Go to Journal of Performance of Constructed Facilities
Journal of Performance of Constructed Facilities
Volume 30Issue 6December 2016

History

Received: Jul 14, 2015
Accepted: Mar 14, 2016
Published online: Jun 10, 2016
Discussion open until: Nov 10, 2016
Published in print: Dec 1, 2016

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Authors

Affiliations

Corey T. Fallon, S.M.ASCE
Graduate Student, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA 18015.
Spencer E. Quiel, Ph.D., M.ASCE [email protected]
P.E.
Assistant Professor, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA 18015 (corresponding author). E-mail: [email protected]
Clay J. Naito, Ph.D., M.ASCE
P.E.
Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA 18015.

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