Technical Papers
Nov 21, 2014

Enabling Construction 4D Topological Analysis for Effective Construction Planning

Publication: Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering
Volume 30, Issue 1

Abstract

Construction four-dimensional (4D) models have emerged to become a powerful tool for effective construction planning and control. However, the emphasis has been visualization and 4D topological analysis capabilities are not well-incorporated in the existing practice. Some 4D models enabled space-time conflict detection or site layout analysis, subtypes of 4D topological analysis; these functions are fragmented and constrained in particular construction scenarios. This paper presents a generic construction 4D topology framework that enables 4D topological analysis to support a wide range of construction planning tasks. The framework includes a 4D topological representation method that formalizes the spatial-temporal relationships between construction activities, a topology categorization method that formats the 4D topological representations into task templates, and a mathematical method to conduct the analysis. The framework is tested in a prototype through a case study, which proves that the framework is able to facilitate many construction planning works such as space-time conflict detection and test for crane’s cover range.

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Acknowledgments

The research reported in this paper was partially funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) via Grant CMMI-1265895. The writers gratefully acknowledge NSF’s support. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this paper are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF, Purdue University, or Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville.

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Go to Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering
Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering
Volume 30Issue 1January 2016

History

Received: Apr 20, 2014
Accepted: Oct 22, 2014
Published online: Nov 21, 2014
Discussion open until: Apr 21, 2015
Published in print: Jan 1, 2016

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Authors

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Assistant Professor, Dept. of Construction, School of Engineering, Southern Illinois Univ., Edwardsville, IL 62025. E-mail: [email protected]
Hubo Cai, M.ASCE [email protected]
Assistant Professor, Division of Construction Engineering and Management, Lyles School of Civil Engineering, Purdue Univ., 550 Stadium Mall Dr., West Lafayette, IN 47907 (corresponding author). E-mail: [email protected]

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