Technical Papers
Jun 20, 2016

Owners’ Role in Facilitating Prevention through Design

Publication: Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education and Practice
Volume 143, Issue 1

Abstract

Exploratory research was performed on a promising safety intervention concept, prevention through design (PtD), also known as designing for construction safety (DfCS). The overall research goal was to increase understanding of the role that owners of constructed facilities can play in adopting PtD on their capital projects. A total of 65 face-to-face interviews and 79 anonymous surveys were completed at four case-study organizations in addition to 103 surveys completed online by members of national construction associations and organizations. Industry survey data indicate that while the majority of owner firm employees had not heard of PtD, they find the concept compelling and do not anticipate significant barriers to its implementation. Key empirical findings indicate that (1) an explicit PtD process is required for implementation; (2) proactive owner leadership and involvement are necessary to initiate PtD on a project; (3) owner leadership is required both to set high expectations for worker safety and health and to ensure general contractor and trade contractor personnel participation in the design review process; and (4) supporting tools, such as design checklists, four dimensional (4D) computer-aided design (CAD) systems, and risk identification and assessment documents, facilitate the PtD process. These findings can be used by owners to most effectively implement a PtD program on one or more of their projects.

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Go to Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education and Practice
Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education and Practice
Volume 143Issue 1January 2017

History

Received: Dec 31, 2015
Accepted: Apr 25, 2016
Published online: Jun 20, 2016
Discussion open until: Nov 20, 2016
Published in print: Jan 1, 2017

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Authors

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T. Michael Toole, F.ASCE [email protected]
P.E.
Professor, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Bucknell Univ., Lewisburg, PA 17837 (corresponding author). E-mail: [email protected]
John A. Gambatese, M.ASCE [email protected]
P.E.
Professor, School of Civil and Construction Engineering, Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR 97331. E-mail: [email protected]
Deborah A. Abowitz [email protected]
Professor, Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology, Bucknell Univ., Lewisburg, PA 17837. E-mail: [email protected]

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