Case Studies
Apr 28, 2018

Estimating Residential Property Loss Reduction from a Proposed Coastal Barrier System in the Houston-Galveston Region

Publication: Natural Hazards Review
Volume 19, Issue 3

Abstract

In the wake of increasing development in coastal metropolitan areas, there are growing concerns about the impact of a potential storm surge event on residential properties. This study examines how a coastal storm surge suppression system could reduce residential flood losses in the Houston-Galveston region. Losses avoided are measured by analyzing the impact of three proxy storm surge scenarios (10 years/10% chance, 100 years/1% chance, and 500 years/0.2% chance) and a hypothetical Hurricane Ike event. An estimation of direct losses using a customized Hazards US Multi-Hazard (Hazus-MH) model shows that residential structures worth between $6 and $16 billion are exposed to potential inundation, with direct losses ranging from $0.5 to $8 billion. The proposed storm surge infrastructure, however, results in about 70 to 95% reduction in residential losses, which is about $0.4 to $7 billion depending on storm intensity. By combining in a novel way various built environment and hydrological data sets, this study provides critical information to decision makers on the effectiveness of storm surge barriers in reducing the adverse impacts of flood events on vulnerable coastal communities.

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Acknowledgments

This paper is based on research supported by the US National Science Foundation (Grant No. 1545837). The findings and opinions reported are those of the authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the funding organization or those who provided assistance with various aspects of the study.

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Go to Natural Hazards Review
Natural Hazards Review
Volume 19Issue 3August 2018

History

Received: Jul 6, 2017
Accepted: Jan 10, 2018
Published online: Apr 28, 2018
Published in print: Aug 1, 2018
Discussion open until: Sep 28, 2018

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Ph.D. Candidate, Urban and Regional Science, Dept. of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning, Texas A&M Univ., 3137 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (corresponding author). ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4616-7917. Email: [email protected]
Samuel D. Brody [email protected]
Professor, Center for Texas Beaches and Shores, Dept. of Marine Sciences, Texas A&M Univ. at Galveston, 200 Seawolf Pkwy., Galveston, TX 77553-6175. Email: [email protected]
Wesley E. Highfield [email protected]
Associate Professor, Center for Texas Beaches and Shores, Dept. of Marine Sciences, Texas A&M Univ. at Galveston, 200 Seawolf Pkwy., Galveston, TX 77553-6175. Email: [email protected]
William J. Merrell [email protected]
Professor, Center for Texas Beaches and Shores, Dept. of Marine Sciences, Texas A&M Univ. at Galveston, 200 Seawolf Pkwy., Galveston, TX 77553-6175. Email: [email protected]

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