Technical Papers
Jun 26, 2020

Stiffness and Strength Demands for Pin-Supported Walls in Reinforced-Concrete Moment Frames

Publication: Journal of Structural Engineering
Volume 146, Issue 9

Abstract

Criteria are proposed for determining the stiffness and strength demands for the seismic design of pin-supported walls in low- and medium-rise reinforced-concrete moment frames. A plasticity ratio and a global stiffness ratio are introduced to evaluate the effect of pin-supported walls (PS walls) in mobilizing the seismic capacity of the moment frame. Incremental dynamic analyses of 4-, 8-, and 12-story prototype PS wall-moment frames of various global stiffness ratios show that a constant stiffness ratio of two can generally ensure the formation of a global plastic mechanism no matter if the moment frame is a strong column-weak beam one or not. By mobilizing more structural elements to resist the earthquake action, the PS walls also increase the earthquake-resisting strength of the structure. Higher mode vibrations have a major effect on the strength demand for PS walls. Simple criteria are also developed for estimating the strength demands for the purpose of preliminary design of PS walls. The same methods for determining the stiffness and strength demands for PS walls are also applicable to other strong spine systems.

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Data Availability Statement

Some data, models, or codes that support the findings of this study are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request. They include the full details and OpenSees models of the prototype planar frames, the IDA results, and the corresponding hinge ratios.

Acknowledgments

This work was jointly supported by the Scientific Research Fund of the Institute of Engineering Mechanics, China Earthquake Administration (Grant No. 2016A05), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51478441).

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Published In

Go to Journal of Structural Engineering
Journal of Structural Engineering
Volume 146Issue 9September 2020

History

Received: Aug 27, 2018
Accepted: Apr 6, 2020
Published online: Jun 26, 2020
Published in print: Sep 1, 2020
Discussion open until: Nov 26, 2020

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Authors

Affiliations

Professor, Key Laboratory of Earthquake Engineering and Engineering Vibration, Institute of Engineering Mechanics, China Earthquake Administration, Yanjiao, Hebei 065201, China (corresponding author). ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6368-2147. Email: [email protected]
Ting Gong
P.E.
Analyst, Dept. of Risk Modeling & Analytics, China Re Catastrophe Risk Management, Beijing 100052, China.
Graduate Student, Institute of Engineering Mechanics, China Earthquake Administration, Hebei 065201, China. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2388-3638
Qiqi Li
P.E.
Engineer, Research Dept. for Engineering Technical Design, China Institute of Building Standard Design and Research, Beijing 100048, China.
Tao Wang, Ph.D.
Professor, Institute of Engineering Mechanics, China Earthquake Administration, Hebei 065201, China.

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