Technical Papers
Apr 29, 2020

Development of Systematic Mitigation Strategy Utilizing Computer-Based Guidelines for Reflective Cracking

Publication: Journal of Transportation Engineering, Part B: Pavements
Volume 146, Issue 3

Abstract

Composite pavements currently are the most prevalent pavement type for highway rehabilitation projects in the US. However, composite pavements are susceptible to pavement distresses inherent in hot-mix asphalt (HMA) pavement and portland cement concrete (PCC) pavement. Reflective cracking is one of the most common distresses for composite pavements and contributes to premature failure of the HMA pavement and noisy rides. Therefore, a systematic mitigation strategy is needed to select treatment types for reflective cracking by considering the different types of cracks, such as joints and midpanel cracks, on the PCC slab. This research found that midpanel cracks on PCC slabs would be most likely create severe cracks on the HMA pavement. In the crack pattern analysis based on the database with 60 data points from Highway I-69 in Indiana, 92% of the moderate-severity cracks and 70.5% of the high-severity cracks on HMA surface occurred at the midpanel cracks on PCC slabs. Additionally, the testing values of the falling-weight deflectometer (FWD) at the midpanel cracks showed lower values than at the joint cracks. Therefore, based on the new finding, this research proposed a treatment-type selection tree and an algorithm to provide a user-friendly computer-based guideline. This computerized application will help field engineers not only intuitively follow the reflective cracking assessment process with input criteria, but also easily determine a final suggestion based on the crack severity pattern analysis and the treatment selection tree.

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Data Availability Statement

Some or all data, models, or code used during the study were provided by a third party. Direct requests for these materials may be made to the provider as indicated in the Acknowledgments:
Visual inspection (PRC) data for HMA surface and PCC slab,
FWD data, and
Execution file for the computerized application.

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank the Joint Transportation Research Program and the Indiana Department of Transportation for the data collected in this project.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

Go to Journal of Transportation Engineering, Part B: Pavements
Journal of Transportation Engineering, Part B: Pavements
Volume 146Issue 3September 2020

History

Received: Aug 23, 2018
Accepted: Dec 30, 2019
Published online: Apr 29, 2020
Published in print: Sep 1, 2020
Discussion open until: Sep 29, 2020

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Authors

Affiliations

Soojin Yoon, A.M.ASCE [email protected]
Postdoctoral Researcher, Div. of Construction Engineering and Management, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN 47907-2051 (corresponding author). Email: [email protected]
Assistant Professor, Dept. of Engineering Technology, Indiana University-Purdue Univ. Indianapolis, 799 W. Michigan St., ET314B, Indianapolis, IN 46202. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7293-2171. Email: [email protected]
Makarand Hastak, A.M.ASCE [email protected]
Professor and Head, Div. of Construction Engineering and Management, Purdue Univ., 550 Stadium Mall Dr., West Lafayette, IN 47907. Email: [email protected]
Project Manager, Federal Aviation Administration, William J. Hughes Center, Airport Pavement R&D Section, Ang-E262, Bldg. #296, Atlantic City, NJ 08405. Email: [email protected]

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