Technical Papers
Oct 27, 2015

Performance and Cost-Based Comparison of Green and Gray Infrastructure to Control Combined Sewer Overflows

Publication: Journal of Sustainable Water in the Built Environment
Volume 2, Issue 2

Abstract

Rainwater harvesting (RWH) is being used more often today as a water supply and stormwater management green infrastructure (GI). In recent years, GIs in urban water engineering have gained attention due to their lower lifecycle costs—in both implementation and operation phases—rather than traditional gray approaches. The research described in the present paper compared implementation of RWH systems to gray approaches previously designed as a part of the long-term control plan (LTCP) for combined sewer overflow (CSO) control in Toledo, Ohio. RWH scenarios in this study were defined based on different system capacities and release policies, and then combined gray and green scenarios were analyzed according to their hydrologic performance and cost. This study employed long-term continuous hydrologic and hydraulic (H&H) simulations as well as lifecycle cost (LCC) analysis techniques. The results showed that greening the LTCP via RWH could improve the lifecycle cost-effectiveness by 48%. The captured rainwater was considered to supply toilet flushing water demand in buildings.

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Acknowledgments

This paper summarizes the authors’ efforts as a part of the urban Water Infrastructures Sustainability Evaluation (uWISE) project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) through grants CBET-1235855 and 1236660. The authors would like to acknowledge the support of Andy Stepnick from City of Toledo for reviewing the paper, and the Auditors Real Estate Information System (ARIES) staff for providing the GIS data. Furthermore, they thank the contribution of Wesley Shugart-Schmidt and Matthew Chaney, Undergraduate Research Assistant at the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering of University of Utah for initial cost data collection and analysis. Lastly, the corresponding author appreciates the City of San Diego’s Stormwater Department staff for helping with developing stormwater control policies for this paper.

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Go to Journal of Sustainable Water in the Built Environment
Journal of Sustainable Water in the Built Environment
Volume 2Issue 2May 2016

History

Received: Dec 8, 2014
Accepted: Aug 20, 2015
Published online: Oct 27, 2015
Discussion open until: Mar 27, 2016
Published in print: May 1, 2016

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Hassan Tavakol-Davani [email protected]
Ph.D. Candidate, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Utah, 110 Central Campus Dr., Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (corresponding author). E-mail: [email protected]
Steven J. Burian, M.ASCE [email protected]
Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Utah, 110 Central Campus Dr., Salt Lake City, UT 84112. E-mail: [email protected]
Jay Devkota [email protected]
Ph.D. Student, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft St., MS 307, Toledo, OH 43606. E-mail: [email protected]
Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft St., MS 307, Toledo, OH 43606. E-mail: [email protected]

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