Case Studies
Apr 13, 2017

Associations between Sociodemographics and Green Infrastructure Placement in Portland, Oregon

Publication: Journal of Sustainable Water in the Built Environment
Volume 3, Issue 3

Abstract

Past research has shown that green space may not be equitably distributed throughout urban areas based on socioeconomic status. This study assessed correlations between sociodemographic factors and green stormwater infrastructure placement, specifically green streets and green roofs, in Portland, Oregon. Green stormwater infrastructure density and sociodemographic factors were compiled at the scale of U.S. Census block groups. Socioeconomic factors examined were income, age, minority percentage, and education level achieved. Significant correlations using all block groups indicated higher green street densities in areas with lower median income, lower median age, higher percentage of minority groups, and fewer people with a bachelor’s degree. Examining only block groups that included a stormwater facility, areas with lower median income and lower median age had higher densities of green roofs. These relationships suggest that installing green stormwater infrastructure in Portland may contribute to additional social and economic benefits given its placement throughout the city.

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Acknowledgments

This work benefited from support by the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), NSF award DBI-1052875. The authors thank the National Historical Geographic Information System for providing Census data and Portland Bureau of Environmental Services for providing Portland’s green infrastructure and land cover data. The thorough comments of two reviewers contributed to the improvement of the paper and are much appreciated.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

Go to Journal of Sustainable Water in the Built Environment
Journal of Sustainable Water in the Built Environment
Volume 3Issue 3August 2017

History

Received: Mar 22, 2016
Accepted: Jan 26, 2017
Published online: Apr 13, 2017
Published in print: Aug 1, 2017
Discussion open until: Sep 13, 2017

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Authors

Affiliations

Alisha Y. Chan, S.M.ASCE [email protected]
Student, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (corresponding author). E-mail: [email protected]
Kristina G. Hopkins, Ph.D.
Researcher, National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, 1 Park Place, Suite 300, Annapolis, MD 21401.

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