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Technical Papers
Feb 14, 2017

Analytical Techniques for Evaluating the Implementation of Adaptive Traffic Signal Control Systems

Publication: Journal of Transportation Engineering, Part A: Systems
Volume 143, Issue 5

Abstract

Adaptive traffic signal control (ATCS) reduces congestion, improves travel time reliability, and prolongs the effectiveness of traffic signal timing. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate different data sources and analysis techniques to compare the arterial performance for before, during, and after ATCS implementation. This paper presents several analyses using field-collected travel time data and simulation modeling techniques. The paper demonstrates that different sources of travel time data can be used to characterize the corridor performance under ATCS. Although corridor travel time is the traditional way to assess the improvements from the newer technologies, other measures need to be looked at for objective evaluation of the new systems. It is recommended to use multiple evaluation techniques for better decision making as every technique has its own limitations. The methodologies discussed will help transportation engineers, planners, and policymakers to understand what analysis can be conducted at any point of an ATCS deployment to evaluate the system performance. As policies and timings are adjusted, this feedback is an effective way to continuously monitor the ATCS and quantify benefits.

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Alabama Department of Transportation. The contents of this paper reflect the views of the authors, who are responsible for the facts and the accuracy of the data presented herein, and do not necessarily reflect the official views or policies of the sponsoring organizations. These contents do not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation.

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Information

Published In

Go to Journal of Transportation Engineering, Part A: Systems
Journal of Transportation Engineering, Part A: Systems
Volume 143Issue 5May 2017

History

Received: Jun 8, 2016
Accepted: Oct 26, 2016
Published online: Feb 14, 2017
Published in print: May 1, 2017
Discussion open until: Jul 14, 2017

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Authors

Affiliations

Abhay D. Lidbe, Ph.D. [email protected]
Dept. of Civil Construction and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Alabama, P.O. Box 870205, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0205 (corresponding author). E-mail: [email protected]
Elsa G. Tedla [email protected]
Research Engineer, Dept. of Civil Construction and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Alabama, P.O. Box 870205, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0205. E-mail: [email protected]
Alexander M. Hainen, Ph.D. [email protected]
Assistant Professor, Dept. of Civil Construction and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Alabama, P.O. Box 870205, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0205. E-mail: [email protected]
Steven L. Jones Jr., Ph.D., M.ASCE [email protected]
Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil Construction and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Alabama, P.O. Box 870205, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0205. E-mail: [email protected]

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