Case Studies
Nov 21, 2018

Feasibility Assessment for Implementing Adaptive Traffic Signal Control

Publication: Journal of Transportation Engineering, Part A: Systems
Volume 145, Issue 2

Abstract

Adaptive traffic control systems (ATCS) continuously adapt to changing traffic in order to improve traffic performance at signalized intersections. Typical before–after studies evaluate the success of ATCS deployments by assessing only the postimplementation traffic performance. Fully assessing the feasibility of ATCS implementation, however, requires evaluating the changes in long-term ATCS performance with changing traffic demands. This paper illustrates the assessment of long-term ATCS performance of two study corridors. The study uses volume/capacity (v/c) ratio to evaluate the effects of changing corridor flow on corridor-wide delay benefits. The results show that the Sydney Coordinated Adaptive Traffic System (SCATS) improves corridor flow and decreases corridor-wide delays up to a point of ineffectiveness, beyond which the ATCS performance begins to decrease. The ineffectiveness point helps in deriving a reasonable estimate for the magnitude and duration of potential ATCS deployment benefits.

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Published In

Go to Journal of Transportation Engineering, Part A: Systems
Journal of Transportation Engineering, Part A: Systems
Volume 145Issue 2February 2019

History

Received: Mar 1, 2018
Accepted: Jul 25, 2018
Published online: Nov 21, 2018
Published in print: Feb 1, 2019
Discussion open until: Apr 21, 2019

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Abhay D. Lidbe, Ph.D. [email protected]
Postdoctoral Researcher, Alabama Transportation Institute, Univ. of Alabama, P.O. Box 870288, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0205 (corresponding author). Email: [email protected]
Elsa G. Tedla [email protected]
Research Engineer, Dept. of Civil Construction and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Alabama, P.O. Box 870288, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0205. Email: [email protected]
Alexander M. Hainen, Ph.D., M.ASCE [email protected]
Assistant Professor, Dept. of Civil Construction and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Alabama, P.O. Box 870288, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0205. Email: [email protected]
Steven L. Jones Jr., Ph.D., M.ASCE [email protected]
Professor, Dept. of Civil Construction and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Alabama, P.O. Box 870288, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0205. Email: [email protected]

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