Technical Papers
Apr 9, 2020

Look-Ahead Transit Signal Priority Control with Self-Organizing Logic

Publication: Journal of Transportation Engineering, Part A: Systems
Volume 146, Issue 6

Abstract

In this paper, a model for transit signal priority control is presented. The model is based on an adaptive signal control called self-organizing logic (which evolved from fully actuated control) with advanced features, including a platoon-based secondary extension that allows signals along a corridor to maintain coordination. Utilizing advance bus detection, the proposed model grants look-ahead transit signal priority under self-organizing control for a longer time horizon of bus arrival to the intersection. Priority is provided based on a tradeoff between buses and platoons of cars under specific conditions. The model was tested in a simulation network of the national connected vehicle testbed in Anthem, Arizona. The simulation experiments showed that the model, when compared to four other signal control systems, was able to reduce average transit vehicle delay and travel times without having a significant negative impact on regular passenger cars. The developed approach increased the reliability of bus operation by decreasing the standard deviation of travel time. The results showed that both the reduction in bus travel time and the increase in reliability were statistically significant. A sensitivity analysis on demand level indicated that the model outperformed the competing approaches by a promising margin.

Get full access to this article

View all available purchase options and get full access to this article.

Data Availability Statement

Some or all data, models, or code generated or used during this study are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request (VISSIM network model of the case study, baseline signal timing configuration of all intersections in the case study network).

References

Albright, E., and M. Figliozzi. 2012. “Factors influencing effectiveness of transit signal priority and late-bus recovery at signalized-intersection level.” Transp. Res. Rec. 2311 (1): 186–194. https://doi.org/10.3141/2311-18.
Balke, K., C. Dudek, and T. Urbanik II. 2000. “Development and evaluation of intelligent bus priority concept.” Transp. Res. Rec. 1727 (1): 12–19. https://doi.org/10.3141/1727-02.
Beak, B., M. Zamanipour, K. L. Head, and B. Leonard. 2018. “Peer-to-peer priority signal control strategy in a connected vehicle environment.” Transp. Res. Rec. 2672 (18): 15–26. https://doi.org/10.1177/0361198118773567.
Cesme, B., and P. G. Furth. 2013. “Self-organizing control logic for oversaturated arterials.” Transp. Res. Rec. 2356 (1): 92–99. https://doi.org/10.1177/0361198113235600111.
Cesme, B., and P. G. Furth. 2014. “Self-organizing traffic signals using secondary extension and dynamic coordination.” Transp. Res. Part C: Emerging Technol. 48 (Nov): 1–15. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trc.2014.08.006.
Cools, S.-B., C. Gershenson, and B. D’Hooghe. 2013. “Self-organizing traffic lights: A realistic simulation.” In Advances in applied self-organizing systems, 45–55. New York: Springer.
Currie, G., and A. Shalaby. 2008. “Active transit signal priority for streetcars: Experience in Melbourne, Australia, and Toronto, Canada.” Transp. Res. Rec. 2042 (1): 41–49. https://doi.org/10.3141/2042-05.
Day, C. M., and D. M. Bullock. 2017. “Investigation of self-organizing traffic signal control with graphical signal performance measures.” Transp. Res. Rec. 2620 (1): 69–82. https://doi.org/10.3141/2620-07.
Ding, J., M. Yang, W. Wang, C. Xu, and Y. Bao. 2015. “Strategy for multiobjective transit signal priority with prediction of bus dwell time at stops.” Transp. Res. Rec. 2488 (1): 10–19. https://doi.org/10.3141/2488-02.
Ekeila, W., T. Sayed, and M. El Esawey. 2009. “Development of dynamic transit signal priority strategy.” Transp. Res. Rec. 2111 (1): 1–9. https://doi.org/10.3141/2111-01.
Furth, P., and T. H. Muller. 2000. “Conditional bus priority at signalized intersections: Better service with less traffic disruption.” Transp. Res. Rec. 1731 (1): 23–30. https://doi.org/10.3141/1731-04.
Gershenson, C. 2004. “Self-organizing traffic lights.” Preprint, submitted November 30, 2004. https://arxiv.org/abs/nlin/0411066.
Gershenson, C., and D. A. Rosenblueth. 2009. “Modeling self-organizing traffic lights with elementary cellular automata.” Preprint, submitted July 10, 2009. https://arxiv.org/abs/0907.1925.
Kim, W., and L. Rilett. 2005. “Improved transit signal priority system for networks with nearside bus stops.” Transp. Res. Rec. 1925 (1): 205–214. https://doi.org/10.1177/0361198105192500121.
Lee, J., A. Shalaby, J. Greenough, M. Bowie, and S. Hung. 2005. “Advanced transit signal priority control with online microsimulation-based transit prediction model.” Transp. Res. Rec. 1925 (1): 185–194. https://doi.org/10.1177/0361198105192500119.
Liu, H., A. Skabardonis, W. Zhang, and M. Li. 2004. “Optimal detector location for bus signal priority.” Transp. Res. Rec. 1867 (1): 144–150. https://doi.org/10.3141/1867-17.
McLeod, F., and N. Hounsell. 2003. “Bus priority at traffic signals—Evaluating strategy options.” J. Public Transp. 6 (3): 1. https://doi.org/10.5038/2375-0901.6.3.1.
Moghimi, B., A. Safikhani, C. Kamga, W. Hao, and J. Ma. 2018. “Short-term prediction of signal cycle on an arterial with actuated-uncoordinated control using sparse time series models.” IEEE Trans. Intell. Transp. Syst. 20 (8): 2976–2985. https://doi.org/10.1109/TITS.2018.2870400.
Moghimi, B., M. Zamanipour, P. G. Furth, C. Kamga, G. Vadakpat, and L. Head. 2019. “Signal priority: Comparison of two recent traffic signal control models.” In Proc., Transportation Research Board 98th Annual Meeting (No. 19-03804). Washington, DC: Transportation Research Board.
Moghimidarzi, S., P. G. Furth, and B. Cesme. 2016. “Predictive–tentative transit signal priority with self-organizing traffic signal control.” Transp. Res. Rec. 2557 (1): 77–85. https://doi.org/10.3141/2557-08.
Ngan, V., T. Sayed, and A. Abdelfatah. 2004. “Impacts of various parameters on transit signal priority effectiveness.” J. Public Transp. 7 (3): 4. https://doi.org/10.5038/2375-0901.7.3.4.
Shalaby, A., J. Lee, J. Greenough, S. Hung, and M. D. Bowie. 2006. “Development, evaluation, and selection of advanced transit signal priority concept directions.” J. Public Transp. 9 (5): 6. https://doi.org/10.5038/2375-0901.9.5.6.
Smith, H. R., B. Hemily, and M. Ivanovic. 2005. Transit signal priority (TSP): A planning and implementation handbook. Washington, DC: Intelligent Transportation Society of America.
Wadjas, Y., and P. Furth. 2003. “Transit signal priority along arterials using advanced detection.” Transp. Res. Rec. 1856 (1): 220–230. https://doi.org/10.3141/1856-24.
Zamanipour, M., K. L. Head, Y. Feng, and S. Khoshmagham. 2016. “Efficient priority control model for multimodal traffic signals.” Transp. Res. Rec. 2557 (1): 86–99. https://doi.org/10.3141/2557-09.
Zamanipour, M., L. Head, and J. Ding. 2014. “Priority system for multimodal traffic signal control.” In Proc., Transportation Research Board 93rd Annual Meeting. Washington, DC: Transportation Research Board.
Zlatkovic, M., P. Martin, and A. Stevanovic. 2011. “Predictive priority for light rail transit: University light rail line in Salt Lake county, Utah.” Transp. Res. Rec. 2259 (1): 168–178. https://doi.org/10.3141/2259-16.

Information & Authors

Information

Published In

Go to Journal of Transportation Engineering, Part A: Systems
Journal of Transportation Engineering, Part A: Systems
Volume 146Issue 6June 2020

History

Received: Mar 7, 2019
Accepted: Dec 4, 2019
Published online: Apr 9, 2020
Published in print: Jun 1, 2020
Discussion open until: Sep 9, 2020

Permissions

Request permissions for this article.

Authors

Affiliations

Ph.D. Candidate, Dept. of Civil Engineering, City College of New York, New York, NY 10031 (corresponding author). ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4129-1388. Email: [email protected]
Camille Kamga, A.M.ASCE [email protected]
Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, City College of New York, New York, NY 10031. Email: [email protected]
Mehdi Zamanipour [email protected]
National Research Council Research Associate, Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center, Federal Highway Administration, 6300 Georgetown Pike, McLean, VA 22102. Email: [email protected]

Metrics & Citations

Metrics

Citations

Download citation

If you have the appropriate software installed, you can download article citation data to the citation manager of your choice. Simply select your manager software from the list below and click Download.

View Options

Get Access

Access content

Please select your options to get access

Log in/Register Log in via your institution (Shibboleth)
ASCE Members: Please log in to see member pricing

Purchase

Save for later Information on ASCE Library Cards
ASCE Library Cards let you download journal articles, proceedings papers, and available book chapters across the entire ASCE Library platform. ASCE Library Cards remain active for 24 months or until all downloads are used. Note: This content will be debited as one download at time of checkout.

Terms of Use: ASCE Library Cards are for individual, personal use only. Reselling, republishing, or forwarding the materials to libraries or reading rooms is prohibited.
ASCE Library Card (5 downloads)
$105.00
Add to cart
ASCE Library Card (20 downloads)
$280.00
Add to cart
Buy Single Article
$35.00
Add to cart

Get Access

Access content

Please select your options to get access

Log in/Register Log in via your institution (Shibboleth)
ASCE Members: Please log in to see member pricing

Purchase

Save for later Information on ASCE Library Cards
ASCE Library Cards let you download journal articles, proceedings papers, and available book chapters across the entire ASCE Library platform. ASCE Library Cards remain active for 24 months or until all downloads are used. Note: This content will be debited as one download at time of checkout.

Terms of Use: ASCE Library Cards are for individual, personal use only. Reselling, republishing, or forwarding the materials to libraries or reading rooms is prohibited.
ASCE Library Card (5 downloads)
$105.00
Add to cart
ASCE Library Card (20 downloads)
$280.00
Add to cart
Buy Single Article
$35.00
Add to cart

Media

Figures

Other

Tables

Share

Share

Copy the content Link

Share with email

Email a colleague

Share